Two things have helped me manage my anxiety and depression above all else. Being honest about it with other people, and learning more about it. I’ve found certain books to help with that more than anything. Here’s five that I think might just help you too:

Reasons to Stay Alive – Matt Haig

This book will make you uncomfortable. The title itself brings forward the realities of struggling with suicide and mental health and throws it right in your face. Many people probably already know of it, and for those of you who haven’t yet read it, I strongly suggest you do. Matt gives a truly honest account of his struggles with mental health. The back and forth nature of him speaking to his past self brings optimism to even the darkest situations. It opens the doors into the depths of what the people’s darkest days might look like, without the glorification that fiction and films often give depression. The world needs more of this as it gives people with mental illness hope, and people without it understanding.

“To other people, it sometimes seems like nothing at all. You are walking around with your head on fire and no one can see the flames.”
― Matt Haig, Reasons to Stay Alive

The Brain: A User’s Manual – Marco Magrini

Ever since I started to understand mental health, the human brain has become more fascinating (and scary). While not specifically focused on mental health, this book gives a fairly technical yet humorous guide to the complexity contained within our craniums. Written in the guise of a user manual for a new product, it dives into the things we do and don’t know about how the brain works, why we react the way we do and the underlying reasons for it’s “malfunctions”. If you can get over the fact that reading this book is essentially your brain trying to learn more about itself, it makes for an excellent deep dive.

“Your brain is delivered to you pre-installed, so there is no need for complex connections or settings selections to make it work.”
― Marco Magrini, The Brain: A User’s Guide

Robin – Dave Itzkoff

There aren’t many celebrities that I can remember where I was when I found out they passed away. Gord Downie is one, David Bowie another, but Robin Williams will always stick out in my mind. Aladdin was one of the first films I saw as a young child, so Genie will forever be synonymous with Robin Williams for me. His ability to bring such joy to people through his work was superhuman. Reading this book and understanding the depth of what he was tormented by brings him back to earth a little while making all he achieved seem even more impressive. He wasn’t a perfect man but was driven by a want to bring happiness to others, not just on stage or on film. It’s a stark reminder to us all, that you never know what someone might be hiding beneath the surface.

“I think the saddest people always try their hardest to make people happy. Because they know what it’s like to feel absolutely worthless and they don’t want anybody else to feel like that.”
― Robin Williams

The Little Book of Calm – Lucy Lane

This book may not have the depth of the ones above. It was gifted to me by another friend who struggles with mental health. I’ve found that while it certainly doesn’t offer answers, it serves as a really good anchor to bring you back from spiralling. For a while, during a particularly stressful and overwhelming part of my life, it was an anchor. I carried it in my backpack every day and used it as a means of settling back down. I would find somewhere quiet and read it from the beginning until I could feel my breathing return to normal. Even if that meant the toilet stall at work. Eventually, even just knowing it was there became helpful and although I don’t carry it everywhere anymore. It does, however, still have a spot on my bookshelf.

“After a storm, comes the calm”
― Proverb, the little book of calm

All My Friends Are Superheroes – Andrew Kaufman

I wouldn’t normally reach to fiction for anything mental health-related. It can often portray mental illnesses in a dangerous and glorified light. This book, however, is a short yet brilliant read. I’ve included it here not just because of the entirety of the book being great, but specifically for chapter five “the anxiety monster”. The author’s depiction of anxiety in a new situation, even a hopeful one, is so relatable. Even if you are just a lover of good fiction and beautifully descriptive writing, this book is worth a read.

“There are two ways to get rid of an anxiety monster, my friend – you either have a bath or a nap”
― Andrew Kaufman, All My Friends Are Superheroes